Tuesday, 31 March 2015

Austria: The Skiing Paradise for Travellers

Austria is regarded as a pilgrimage for snow worshippers. It has a variety of snowscapes which no other country can match. It doesn’t matter whether you are a winter sports enthusiast looking for an adrenaline rush, or an amateur in quest of advanced skiing skills, Austria will fulfill all your desires. Here are our picks of Top Skiing destinations of Austria.

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Picture Courtesy: Travelalltogether.com

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Heiligenblut

One of the absolute most striking pictures on the Grossglockner Road is Heiligenblut, the sharp steeple of its holy church surrounded by the glaciated summit of Grossglockner. The town's allwing view and conveniently reached mountains pulls in skiers, climbers and passionate phtographers. The small centre is stacked with wooden chalets and, regardless of an over-burdening kitsch mementos, it holds some customary appeal.

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Semmering

With its clean air and magnificent crests ascending out of enormous interwoven valleys, Semmering is a prominent alpine resort for the Viennese, particularly among the  seasoned crouds which sets in for serene walks or to travel in  awe-inspiring railways; a more youthful set hits the ski pistes. There's no centre of the resort as such, its basically ran along Hochstrasse, which forms a semi-circle  behind the railway station.

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Bad Gastein

Profoundly some place in the middle of Brighton and St Moritz, Bad Gastein runs hot and icy, with curative spas year-round and premier skiing in winter. Despite the fact that the moist is ascending in places, the resort has kept an essence of its nineteenth century prime, when Empress Elisabeth came to bathe and wrote poetry here. Also, the scenery is immortal, belle-epoque manors stick to woodland shrouded bluffs that ascent above vibrant falls and springs still hailed for their magical therapeutic characteristics.

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Picture Courtesy: Worldalldetails.com

Murau

Murau, in the western spans of the Murtal (Mur Valley) on the banks of the stream, is an appealing town loaded with pastel-shaded houses. It's also encompassed by forested slopes and alpine grasslands. Its closeness to Stolzalpe toward the north and the Metnitzer mountains toward the south makes it a great base for climbing and cycling amid the summers.

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Zell am See

Zell am See is show stopper with its azure blue lake, compact centre studded with softly painted chalets, and the snowcapped tops of the Hohe Tauern that recalls on an ideal  paradise. You can jump into the lake and cycle its verdant shores, climb and ski in the mountains and drive high on the Grossglockner Road. Each year it receives more than one million guests from all round the world – from families to playboys in customized mustangs.

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Monday, 30 March 2015

Top 5 Most Beautiful Villages of Spain


While the cities of Spain keep achieving new heights in respect of trade, commerce and finance, its picturesque villages are a perfect escape from the hustle and bustle of the world. Spain is the perfect juxtaposition of urban and rural territories. In the countryside of Spain, you will find villages with pueblos blancos, hilltop fortresses, ruins of the fortified walls and military bases. Moreover you will get acquainted with life of medieval era as many villages still lead their lives in the ancestral way. The charisma of these villages is indescribable. You ought to visit them once In your lifetime.

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Picture Courtesy: Huffingtonpost.com


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 Here is our pick of top 5 most beautiful villages of Spain. 

Albarracin 
           
Albarracin, 38km west of Teruel, is one of Spain's most lovely towns, well known for its half-timbered houses with gloomy pink frontages, reminiscent of southern Italy. It is quite challenging to reach this place, however all the effort which you make, will be justified once you breathe in the otherworldly breeze here, and feel the time stopping by. Battered fortified walls ascend the encompassing inclines and the town's boulevards seem like a labyrinth.


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Puebla de Sanabria

Near to the Portuguese border, this dazzling town is a tangle of medieval back streets that unfold around a fifteenth century palace and stream down the slope. This is one of Spain's loveliest villas and its well worth halting overnight, the calm cobblestones paths make it feel like you've traveled back to centuries.


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Picture Courtesy: Tripadvisor.com



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Cadaques

A whitewashed town around a rough cove, Cadaques’ narrow, rugged roads is ideal for meandering. The famous town and its nearby territories have an unique enchantment – a combination of wind, ocean, light and rock – that isn't diluted even by the droves of summer tourists.


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Ainsa

The excellent hilltop town of medieval Ainsa, is one of Aragon's jewels, an incredible town chopped out of uneven stone. From its peak, you'll get tantalizing panoramas of the mountains, especially the giant rock bastion of La Pena Montanesa.


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Daroca      
                                                                                                                   
Daroca, a lethargic medieval town, was once an Islamic seat and, later, a Christian post town in the early medieval wars against Castilla. Its decently saved old quarter is loaded down historical references and the disintegrating old city walls surround the peaks; the walls once gloated more than hundred military towers.

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Picture Courtesy: Tripadvisor.com

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Courtesy: Traveleze

Saturday, 28 March 2015

Top 5 Eminently Beautiful Towns of Portugal





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With more than 800km of coastline, Portugal can hold you captive when it comes to beaches. Generally a large portion of Portugal's outskirt is formed by its long Atlantic shoreline, and there's a shoreline for every taste – from serene moon-molded bays to rough shores hit by gliding over the surf, from kilometers of almost untouched sand to gathering shorelines where tourists pack in like sardine.

Lagos

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Lagos overflows life. A lively, sunny town, its cute cobbled avenues abound with bistros, restaurants and bars. It's a magnet for hikers and surf men, who swing between its clubs and adjacent majestic shorelines and striking seaside bays. Lagos additionally has a historic clout, having dispatched many sea operations amid Portugal's Age of Discoverie.

Vila Nova De Milfontes

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One of the loveliest towns along this stretch of the coast, Vila Nova de Milfontes has an appealing whitewashed centre, shimmering beaches  in close vicinity and a laid-back populace who cannot think of living at a better place than here. Milfontes stays a to great deal all the more relaxed than most resort towns, besides in August when its stuffed to the grip with surfers and sun-seekers (up to 50,000 individuals around the local area). It's placed amidst the lovely Parque Natural do Sudoeste Alentejano e Costa Vicentina which is still a port nearby an exquisite, sand-edged appendage of estuary.

Zambujeira Do Mar

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 Enchantingly wild shorelines upheld by tough bluffs build the setting of this lethargic ocean side town. The fundamental road ends at the bluff, ways lead to the alluring sands beneath. Quieter than Vila Nova, Zambujeira draws in hikers, surfy swarms, however in August the town is a gathering place and hosts the monstrous music fest, Festa do Sudoeste. The high-season swarms obscure Zambujeira's out-of-season charms: crisp fish in family run restaurants, raving precipice top strolls and a romantic, vacant coast.

Costa da Caparica

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 Costa da Caparica's apparently ceaseless shoreline draws in sun-worshippers, surfers desperate to ride Atlantic waves, and holidaying families looking for clean ocean and delicate sand. It hasn't skipped commercialization, however travel south where the elevated buildings submit to pine woods and smooth shoreline shack bistros. The town has the same name as the coastline, and is a sprightly place with shops and loads of inflatable ocean side tack.

Viana do Castelo

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The gem of the Costa Verde, Viana do Castelo is honored with both an engaging medieval town and beautiful shorelines just outside the city. The old quarters showcase verdant, nineteenth century streets and narrow paths packed with Manueline estates and extravagant castles. The town's setting just by the Rio Lima estuary implies that Viana do Castelo is just a short jump from some brilliant shorelines, furthermore it makes it a  convenient base for exploring the lower Lima valley and the close-by Serra d'Arga mountain.

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